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Roberto Saracco

Roberto Saracco fell in love with technology and its implications long time ago. His background is in math and computer science. Until April 2017 he led the EIT Digital Italian Node and then was head of the Industrial Doctoral School of EIT Digital up to September 2018. Previously, up to December 2011 he was the Director of the Telecom Italia Future Centre in Venice, looking at the interplay of technology evolution, economics and society. At the turn of the century he led a World Bank-Infodev project to stimulate entrepreneurship in Latin America. He is a senior member of IEEE where he leads the New Initiative Committee and co-chairs the Digital Reality Initiative. He is a member of the IEEE in 2050 Ad Hoc Committee. He teaches a Master course on Technology Forecasting and Market impact at the University of Trento. He has published over 100 papers in journals and magazines and 14 books.

Technology changes the language

I drive the car. The car drives me.  Well, it’s a no brainer. The first sentence is right the second is clearly wrong. And yet, technology is turning the table and making the second sentence as correct as the first, and in 50 years time, may be, it will make …

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My eReader keeps me awake…

A study published on the Neuron Journal seems to prove what I have known for quite a while: my eReader keeps me awake even after I put it away! Neuroscientists at the UT Southwestern medical center have identified the neural circuit that regulates the circadian cycle, that alternate of sleeping and awake …

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Grabbing an object with your thoughts

Brain Computer Interfaces, BCI, are making good progress, although we are still quite far from "reading the mind" (and this is not too bad given the scaring implications). In a news coming from the University of Houston we see a report of a combination of mind reading and sophisticated software that allows …

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Micro-sensors to embed in our body

Technology has provided the medical sector with ever more accurate ways of investigating what is going on in our bodies. Radiography, TAC, MRI, fMRI and more let doctors look inside our bodies to see what’s there and also how a given organ or tissue is actually working. Sensors on the …

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Bending light

Light goes straight (yes, I know, it follows the curved space-time) and bending it is not easy. Optical fibres are a way to bend light and plastic fibres, used for optical communication in the home (I have them) are particularly good at that. Yet, even plastic fibres cannot be bend …

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Hacking leaves

Hacking is a positive activity aiming at knowing the inner working of a system to adapt it to specific needs. Over the years, particularly in Information Technology, it has taken a negative face, the one of disrupting in (mostly) an illicit way the working of a system by changing its …

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They are working to put wires into my brain

Researchers at Rice University are exploring the use of carbon nanotubes fibres as wires to embed in our brains. So far stimulation of brain areas and detection of electrical activity in a specific brain area makes use of tiny electrical wires. Their thinness, however, is gross when compared to the size of …

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Entangling atoms

Entanglement is a a very simple property any lay person can understand that at the same time is completely baffling physicists to the point that Einstein, the one that first identified it (with Podolsky and Rosen in a famous article in 1935) used it to show that since it was a consequence of …

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So, what about the next 50 years?

Yesterday I shared some considerations on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the Moore’s law. Today I would like to point your attention to a nice article that has been published on Spectrum on a future without the sort of evolution that has been epitomised by the Moore’s law. At first …

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An unbelievable 50 years

On April 19th, 1965, fifty years ago, the Electronics magazine, Volume 38 – Number 8 published a paper by Gordon Moore "Cramming more components onto integrated circuits" that started with a sentence that have remained in the history of electronics: "The future of integrated electronics is the future of electronics itself". In the …

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